home

Welcome to the Acorns website!

THURROCK ACORNS ARC

Thurrock Acorns Amateur Radio Club is based in Grays (Essex, England) close to the town centre and would welcome anyone from the surrounding area who has an interest in any aspect of Amateur Radio.

Why not drop in to a meeting on the third Tuesday of the month for a chat, a cup of tea or coffee and a biscuit or two.

THURROCK TRAINING TEAM

Thurrock Training Team is a small group of enthusiastic licensed hams on a mission to encourage more people into The Hobby especially younger people.

You can ask for more information on any of the three licence levels or register interest by completing and submitting our on-line Training Enquiry form.

CLUB NIGHT, ON AIR OUTSIDE

If the weather forecast is good we plan to include a B-B-Q! A small donation from non-members to help cover the cost of food would be appreciated.

8pm Tuesday 21st of August

ESSEX 2 METRE ACTIVITY AFTERNOON

Club members will be operating on 2 metres using various modes to encourage greater use of the VHF band solely dedicated to Amateur Radio.

13:00 until 17:00 Saturday 17th of November

GB1EWT at the Thameside Nature Reserve
by Nigel M0ICH

This space-age view from the rooftop veranda at the Essex Wildlife Trust (overlooking the Thames Estuary) was augmented by two temporary radio antennas on 11th August. Members of Thurrock Acorns Amateur Radio Club had set up a public demonstration both inside the cafe area and outside by the playground giving visitors maximum opportunity to see the antennas, equipment and the opportunity to ask questions. The curious sight was enough to entice one visitor to “have a go” on a Morse Key in memory of her Mother who had been a Morse Code operator during the war. Transfer of “data” was also on display using computer screens for the public to see information arriving live from around the world included contacts from America and Japan. Lots of local contacts too using VHF that helped attract attention from visitors to the site.

Liz Turrell (photo) was in for a surprise when she visited Essex Wildlife Trust on 11th August. There was a demonstration of modern Amateur Radio by enthusiasts from the Thurrock Acorns Amateur Radio Club. Many types of radio communication were on display including, importantly for Liz, Morse Code. This brought back memories of her mother who had been a Morse Code operator during the war at RAF Calshot. Her mother returned to her old RAF station a few days before she died and sent her final Morse code message in 1993 which read: “Hello this is NORAH”. Liz was delighted to be asked to re-send her Mother’s message using a Morse code key like the one her Mum would have used following the dots and dashes from crib sheet. Liz’s Morse was easily readable by club members; her Mum would have been proud. This nostalgic moment was the highlight of the club’s visit which also included radio contacts from the USA and Japan.

More photos of this event can be viewed in the gallery
 

Thames Amateur Radio Group event

The Thames Amateur Radio Group will be operating a special event station GB2MFM in September commemorating the 73rd anniversary of the end of WW2. Any licensed operator from any club welcome.

For full details click on the thumbnail below.

Essex CW Amateur Radio Club event

The Essex CW ARC will be running a CW BOOT CAMP on Saturday 27th October in Witham, Essex. Brush up your CW skill with the experts. There will be sessions for beginners, intermediate and advanced CW operators.

For full details click on the thumbnail below.

WHAT IS AMATEUR RADIO?

Amateur (Ham) Radio is arguably the most popular scientific hobby! The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) defines The Hobby this way…

“Amateur radio is a popular technical hobby and volunteer public service that uses designated radio frequencies for non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, and emergency communications.

Amateur Radio is the only hobby governed by international treaty.

As a radio amateur you are able to transmit radio signals on a number of frequency bands allocated specifically to the radio amateurs.”

In reality it is much, much more. Have a look at these RSGB videos for a more interesting view of the possibilities Ham Radio presents.